News Feature

Stonington
Originally published in Island Ad-Vantages, March 16, 2017
Island Film Festival at the Opera House celebrates fishing life

Deer Isle Film Festival

Part two of the Deer Isle Film Festival will screen at the Opera House on Saturday, March 25, at 7 p.m. Still Fishing at 83 features Stonington’s Andy Gove and his extraordinary lifetime of lobstering. Andy Gove's boat Uncles UFO, pictured, has been named among the fastest in Stonington harbor

Penobscot Bay Press file photo

Part two of the Deer Isle Film Festival will screen at the Opera House on Saturday, March 25, at 7 p.m. This time the focus is on the venerable fishing history of Deer Isle with documentaries that feature many of your neighbors and friends. Concessions will open at 6 p.m.

Still Fishing at 83 features Stonington’s Andy Gove and his extraordinary lifetime of lobstering. This veteran, like his great grandfather before him, still rises every day to do what he has done since World War II, through storms and gales and lobster prices lurching from 10 cents to 10 dollars a pound. In Joe Dorr’s Seining Sunshine, another local fisherman, Jeff Boyce, shares the secrets of seining for herring.

A day in the life of Deer Isle’s Eugene Eaton is the subject of a short film narrated by none other than author E.B White. A Maine Lobsterman honors an era when lobster traps were made of wood, and fresh lobsters were stored in a bushel basket.

This celebration of the fishing life includes a few notable women as well. Catherine Larrabee, Kathy Eaton Gray, Ann Eaton, Janet Nevells, and Anita Oliver are all featured in The Stonington Sardine Factory and the Women Who Worked There. The factory, built in 1911 at the foot of Seabreeze Avenue was said to be a model of modern factory construction at the time, canning more than 100,000 cases a season.

For lovers of a good yarn, especially tall stories and the one that got away, the evening features Fish Story: Stonington by Emmy-nominated director Corey Tatarczuk that is all about storytelling and the storytellers who, as Mark Twain once said, “never let the facts get in the way of a good story.” You might catch a tall tale from fishermen such as Ted Ames, Junior Bray, Dick Bridges Ted Hoskins, Rick Trundy and an Eaton or two or someone else you probably know on the subject of superstitions, money, lies, life and death.

For more information, visit operahousearts.org, email info@operahousearts.org or call 367-2788.